Museum on the Go

Bring the Museum to your classroom or community space

BCM’s traveling ‘Museum on the Go’ collections cases can be brought to your classroom or community space. Choose from 30 cases and curriculum kits; topics ranging from natural science to global arts and culture.

Fees and Reservations

Case Rental: Use a Museum on the Go case in your classroom or share it with other classes at your school. All cases include Educator resources and activity suggestions.

$200 for 2 week rental; $50 for each additional week.

Outreach Visit: Includes rental of a Museum on the Go case, and a one-hour hands-on program in your class utilizing the case or connected themes.

$400 for 2 weeks rental + classroom session. (30 students maximum)

Museum on the Go Collection Cases

Adornments From Head to Toe: What are you wearing and what does it say about you? Through close looking at rings, necklaces, anklets, and amulets, student will learn about the role of jewelry and personal adornment in cultures around the world.

African Textiles: Students will learn about Africa’s culture and its peoples through their textile art. The case’s activities and resources focus on three of Africa’s most well known textiles: kente, adinkra, and adire. The case provides students with opportunities to create original adinkra art, make their own wearable cloth, and design their own kente pattern.

Antlers, Horns, and Teeth: Did you know an animal can use its antlers, horns, and teeth as tools or weapons? Students have the chance to explore and compare a shark tooth, deer antler. Impala horn, and elephant tusk, among others.

Bags, Baskets, Bowls, and Beyond: Containers many conceal something inside, but they also reveal a lot about the people who make and use them. This case introduces students to the great variety of containers from around the world.

Butterflies: Science and imagination take flight with this case, thanks to the more than 30 butterfly specimens inside. Curriculum focuses on the butterfly’s beauty as well as its body structure and lifecycle.

Day of the Dead: This case focuses on the rich folk art traditions of how Dia de los Muertos is celebrated.

Dolls of World Cultures: The dolls in this case aren’t toys—they’re cultures ambassadors! Students will enjoy the opportunities for creativity and cross-cultural studies that the dolls invite.

Fossils: Specimens have the power to tell us many things, provided we are willing to look at them in detail and think about what those details mean. This case encourages your students to carefully examine the fossils and touch them gently.

Insects: Introduce your students to some incredible insects! Using 28 plastomounts containing actual insects, students will investigate insect body structures and lifecycles.

Inside India: Discover life inside India! A doll in a sari, a yo-yo, a toe ring, finger cymbals, and other authentic artifacts introduce students to the traditions of the world’s second-most populous country and some of its unique traditions.

Land Birds of New York City: This case encourages students to look to the skies and familiarize themselves with local birds, including a woodpecker, warbler, starling, and a robin. They can learn to build a birdhouse and listen to birdcalls.

Masks: Go “behind the mask” with examples from the Northwest Coast, Guatemala, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and West Africa, Students will make masks, and learn about their meanings and uses around the world.

Mexican Folk Art: This case invites students to discover the vibrant culture and traditional crafts of Mexico. Students may handle handcrafted objects such as s ceramic owl, woven bag, and maracas.

Musical Instruments of Africa: Bring the sounds of Africa to your classroom! Students may play the angle harp. Kettledrum, rattles, bell and thumb piano included in the case. They will also construct their own instruments and learn to sing, clap, and play along with traditional African songs.

New York 100 Years Ago: From school and work to domestic chores and leisure pursuits, this case will give your students an idea of what life was like in New York in 1900.

Northeast Woodlands Native Americans: Catch a glimpse into the lives of New York’s original residents. Students can compare wampum and projectile points to the materials from which they were made, and a stone pendant to its silver successor.

Pattern Wizardry: Patterns surround us in all natural and human made forms! Students learn to recognize the concept of a pattern as anything with a distinctive, consistent, and repeating arrangement of units; identifying and describing linear and nonlinear types of patterns; creating, extending, and representing those patterns in a variety of ways.

Predators and Prey: How do animals attack and defend themselves? By examining a rattlesnake skull, turtle shell, porcupine quills, and grizzly bear claws, student will discover the unique adaptations and behaviors animals use to stay alive in the wild.

Reptiles: Lizards and gators and snakes, oh my! Don’t forget turtles, too. Students will handle genuine reptile skins, bones, and specimens as they learn about these fascinating creatures’ body structures, lifecycles, and behaviors.

Rocks and Minerals: How do you use rocks and minerals in your everyday life? Besides learning about geology through rock and mineral specimen, students also have a chance to compare them with a variety of objects made from those materials.

Shells and Sea Life: Ideal for classifying and researching ocean life, this case contains an abalone, spider conch, octopus, and fifteen other sea treasures.

Telling Stories Through Objects: Can you learn an object’s story just by looking at it? By pairing a Hopi kachina, an Indonesian shadow puppet, and other objects with stories related to their background or culture, this case invites students to look at objects closely to see what they can discover and encourages creative responses.

The Central Inuit: How can people thrive in the harsh climate of the Arctic? By examining the snow goggle, bone knife, costume doll, and other artifacts in the case, student will learn about how the Central Inuit people have adapted to life in the bitter cold of Greenland.

Urban Naturalist: Help your students discover the natural world all around them! By examining a squirrel, a bird, insects, and leaves collected right here in Brooklyn, students will learn how to look for evidence of nature in the big city.

Volcanoes!: This case will have your students erupting with excitement! Volcanic rocks, cinders, dust, ash, and other specimens will help students learn about geology and understand what happens when a volcano erupts.